Family, Girls’ Trips, and Coastal Towns (Part 4)

Charleston, SC 

Wow! So it has only taken me three months to finally finish editing these photos and get around to writing this blog. This hot summer proved to be a busy one! But now I’ll sit down and tell you about a trip to one of my favorite places…Charleston, SC. I absolutely adore this city, and my daughter and I visited here for a mother-daughter trip for the second time in two years. This time we were able to take our time and explore and have fun!

The trip out was pretty nice, and we listened to our favorite music all the way. We only had to turn around once when Googly Bear told us to “stay right to keep left”. That produced quite the confusion and laughter. Along the way, however, we happened upon a woods fire. I think it was a controlled burn as it was happening on a tree farm. We were on a back road somewhere in South Carolina, so we stopped, got out, and took some photos.

I decided that a couple of these shots would make for some good light glowing in the eerie fog photos, so I doctored them up a bit in post-processsing and came up with these:

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And as for spooky photos, Charleston is a great place to do a little ghost hunting. We headed out every evening for a little ghost hunting and exploring the city at night. We didn’t find any ghosts this time, but we found some places they sure would like. The city is filled with graveyards, old churches, and parks full of haunting stories and pirate tales. If you ever make it out there, be sure to take one of the walking ghost tours.

Aside from ghost hunting, this trip gave me and my daughter some bonding time…mostly in the form of me acting like a teenager again. Our condo had a loft with some pretty good acoustics, so we sang and said silly stuff just to hear our voices bounce around the room. It also made a good spot to throw pillows from. We stayed up late giggling and having a blast!

During the days, we explored the city hitting the Market first to pick up a few things we can only find in Charleston. Then we hit the sidewalks to find all that we could find in a two day span.  There are several interesting historic churches and graveyards to visit,

as well as dozens of historic buildings,

and interesting doors, alleys, parks, and windows.

We were also able to visit the Nathaniel Russel House with its beautiful gardens…

…lovely antique decor…

…and stunning architecture.

(And that gold paint on the crown molding…it has actual 24 kt gold in it! Wow!)

Well, at the end of this trip, we had walked our feet off and had a wonderful little girls’ trip. Of course, as is the case with most of our trips, there must be some disaster along with our adventure. I ran over something in the road and got a hole in my tire just outside of Charleston. Much thanks to the SCDOT for coming to assist me with a tire change and the wonderful guy at Automotive Solutions for repairing the tire and getting us back on the road and headed home.

And that, my friends, is the end of our Spring 2016 girls’ adventures. Keep checking for future adventures! A trip back out to Arkansas and Missouri are soon to come!

 

Family, Girls’ Trips, and Coastal Towns (Part 3)

Savannah, GA

Well, Savannah just happens to be on our way home from Jekyll Island, so it seemed like a perfect place to stop to eat…and take pictures, and visit churches, and see parks, and get chocolate! What can I say? We’re women. We need chocolate.

Now, after the adventures of the previous two days, you would think we would have no energy left for walking. Well, you would be right…but we mustered some up anyway. We thought we might indulge in a carriage ride, but apparently it was necessary to book those in advance if possible, so we had to pass. I did, however, get a couple of nice photos of some carriages and horses…

…and a dog poking his head out of a second story window where some construction was in progress.

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And of course, the squirrels couldn’t let the dogs and horses take all of the camera time, so a couple of those little guys posed for photos too.

The flowers were in bloom, so the parks were dotted with lots of beautiful colors.

And my beautiful daughter…well, we had to purchase a souvenir T-shirt to cover her sunburned shoulders.

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And a fountain seemed to be a great place for two girls to stop and rest their feet (and text I suppose).

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Now this was rather a rushed trip, as it is impossible to see all there is to see in Savannah in an afternoon. I, however, did my best to provide a speed tour. The Lutheran church, the Catholic church, and Forsyth Park made the list for the day to introduce my family to the beauty of Savannah.

We stopped in at the Lutheran Church first. I had visited this one in the past and wanted to show my mother the stained glass windows.

After visiting here for a few minutes, a nice gentleman who was a member of the church told us a little bit about the history of the building. Then he recommended that we take a short walk to the Catholic cathedral to see its beauty. The last time I was in the city, we didn’t make it to the Catholic church before the doors were closed to the public. This day, however, we were lucky enough to get to go inside. And what a sight it was!

It felt a bit irreverent walking around taking photos in the church like that, but there were others there admiring and taking photos as well. I hope we didn’t disturb those who had come there for more spiritual reasons.

Our next stop was Forsyth Park which is the largest of the parks in Savannah. We were greeted on entering by a young barefoot man playing his acoustic guitar and singing.

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I think perhaps he was one of the college students.

Finally, we headed to LuLu’s Chocolate Bar to indulge in a decadent chocolate confection. I, unfortunately, have no photos of that wondrous dessert as we ate it…all.  Now, though this is the end of this adventure, there is still one more to come. About a month later, my daughter and I traveled to the beautiful city of Charleston, so stay tuned for that adventure!

 

Girl’s Trip! (Part 2: Chattanooga)

Wow! So part two only took a month to get written. It is that crazy holiday time of the year, so as usually happens, life gets in the way of writing. The good news, however, is that I now have several wonderful events to write about. But before I move on to holiday cheer, it is time to finish my Girls’ Trip blog.

Now where did I leave you? That’s right…after we finished our hike at Cloudland Canyon, we drove over the mountain to Chattanooga. Thirty minutes later we were checking in to the Chattanooga Choo-Choo. This historic location was once the train station in Chattanooga. Now it serves as a hotel and historic attraction. The main lobby where you check in is in the old rail station and is quite lovely. You should definitely drop by and take a look if you’re ever in the area.

They have rooms in some of the old rail cars which might be an interesting overnight experience, but my daughter and I stayed in the standard hotel portion. Apparently the site was under a major restoration, so it didn’t prove to be the best time to stay. As for location, however, we were in a prime area for visiting this lovely city.

On our first morning, we found ourselves in need of something warm to drink. Lucky for us The Hot Chocolatier was right across the street. We started our Chattanooga adventure off with some of the best hot chocolate we’ve ever tasted…and a couple of truffles to accompany the delicious beverages. My truffle was lavender. I didn’t even know you could eat lavender, but now I know what lavendar tastes like (just like it smells by the way). Interesting.

Then we headed off to the aquarium. We decided to get passes for the Behind the Scenes Tour. We arrived at the aquarium approximately an hour before the tour began, so needless to say, we were unable to wander far. The tour was in the ocean aquarium, so we started out on the top floor of this building. To my delight, at the very top of the escalator was a sign pointing to the butterfly sanctuary! I didn’t even know they had one of these, so I again found myself in butterfly heaven on a trip. Yay! Before we entered Butterfly Heaven, however, we were greeted by two large blue Hyacinth Macaws who found great pleasure in laughing at all passers-by.

After talking to and laughing with the macaws for a little while, we headed to the butterfly room. To my daughter’s dismay, we ended up in this room before and after the tour. Though she enjoyed the butterflies, she was afraid I might decide to spend too much time there dooming her to miss the rest of the aquarium. Her fears were unjustified, however, as we did see all of the aquarium.

Inside I managed many wonderful shots of these beautiful lepidoptera. And after the tour, we enjoyed the pleasure of releasing some newly hatched butterflies into the habitat.

The Behind the Scenes tour was equally amazing. We were able to see the penguins up close and learn about them and their habits and habitat.

Did you know they raise one arm to regulate their body temperature? And their normal body temperature is 104 degrees Fahrenheit? Those are just a couple of the cool facts we learned about these interesting creatures. Penguins are awesome!

After visiting the penguins, we headed to the large saltwater tank. We were taken into the room where the divers enter the water and the sea creatures are fed. We met the divers and learned a bit about their job. Then we met with the people that feed the animals. We learned about their diet, where they get the food, and which creature eats what.

Then we were given the pleasure of feeding the sea turtles!

Then we had an animal encounter with a glass lizard. This particular lizard is legless and looks disturbingly like a snake. He wouldn’t stay still enough for me to get a good shot, so I will be unable to share a picture of this amazing creature.

The rest of the ocean aquarium was typical for a saltwater habitat.

After we finished the ocean aquarium, we took a walk to find some lunch. We walked under the bridge and found a hidden park. It was like a secret world. We didn’t actually find any lunch. Instead we found ice cream at The Ice Cream Show. It was enough to tide us over until dinner. Then it was back to the aquarium to visit the river side.

Now, I must admit, I am not a fan of river fish…except for eating. They aren’t the loveliest of fishes. There were some other interesting aqueous inhabitants, however.

My favorite river buddies live around the water on the banks of the river and use the waters a food source and place to play. Say hello to the River Otter!

And of course there was the regular array of reptilian, amphibian, and avian riverside inhabitants.

Unfortunately, our river adventure was cut short due to caterers setting up for an after-hours party.

On our last day in Chattanooga, we headed across the river for a shopping trip. Our first stop was in Coolidge Park for a ride on the carousel.

And of course any good shopping trip starts off with coffee, so we hunted down a great little coffee shop called The Stone Cup. We hung out at the coffee shop for nearly an hour sipping Peppermint Mocha and enjoying art. By the time we left, it was lunch time, so we picked up some sub sandwiches and headed to the Walnut Street Bridge to eat. Then we made our second trip to the Ice Cream Show for coffee and ice cream. We spent the rest of the afternoon inspecting the record and book collections of several shops. Our only find was a Disney trivia book that kept us occupied while at the ice cream shop.

We ended our day with a little down-time in Coolidge Park. My daughter played her guitar while I walked around taking photos.

A perfect end to an amazing Girls’ Trip.

 

 

 

Rain, Angels, and Pondering Life

This past weekend, I set out on a trip to Rome, GA. I went to school there once…a long time ago. My how the city has changed and grown in the last twenty plus years, and perhaps my memory has faded a bit over the years as well. What I went in search for this particular day was a cemetery I once was shooed out of by a friendly local officer. Why you ask? Well, when a group of college girls go wandering about an old cemetery at night, it is apparently a recipe for disaster according to local law enforcement. We were kindly warned about strange men who sleep in cemeteries at night and attack young girls. I’m sure there was some truth to this warning; however, I am sure it was embellished a bit to scare us away as well. So, what do I do now that I’m nearly 41? Well, go wandering about that cemetery alone in the middle of a thunderstorm of course! I know…probably not the safest thing to do, but where’s the adventure in being safe? Of course, in case of attack, I’m pretty sure this camera of mine would put a pretty good sized dent in someone’s head. In case of lightning, however…well, at least I was already in the cemetery, right? That’s what I texted my husband, anyway. To which he replied, “It gives a whole new meaning to cremation.” Lovely vote of confidence that man gives.

I suppose I should get on with my story now. I dropped the family off at Six Flags (I will spare you the story about why I avoid that place at all costs), and I headed toward Rome. I arrived at Myrtle Hill Cemetery late morning or perhaps around noon (I wasn’t really paying attention to the time). It was looking rather cloudy, and it had rained along the drive. I parked in the empty lot, got my camera ready, and stepped out of the car. Then I felt raindrops. After briefly contemplating whether to risk a trek up the hill or not, I got back in my car, and just in time, it would seem, as a monsoon began. I managed a couple of photos of the rather large and imposing mausoleum before and during the downpour.

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As I sat in my car, I mulled over the fact that rain seemed to stop my adventures way too often. I came to the conclusion that I either need a waterproof cover for my camera or a waterproof camera. I now have a lovely waterproof camera on my Amazon wishlist…emphasis on the wish. After sitting for quite some time, I determined that I was not going to let the rain ruin my trip, and I began to drive. So I found an entrance, and I began to drive up that hill. I waited patiently for breaks in the rain to get out and wander about (never too far from the car, mind you, as the rain could come pouring down and ruin my trusty camera at any minute).

Stepping out of my car onto the narrow path high above the city was just a bit unnerving, especially with the thunder and looming storm clouds. However, the rain had abated for a bit, and I was determined to get some photos. The first scene to dazzle my senses was of the city far below. I didn’t realize just how high that hill was until I was standing at the top gazing at the city of the living far below from atop my perch in the city of the dead.

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Now pay special attention to the center of this photograph. Do you see the clock tower right there in the middle? Good. There will be a quiz later.

Now the next thing I began to notice from my perch high above the city was something very frightening and dangerous. Well, frightening and dangerous if you’re a Whovian like myself. I began to see that I was surrounded. By what you ask? By Weeping Angels. They were everywhere! What is a Weeping Angel?! Poor unsuspecting normal people, you must be educated so as not to be caught unaware. A weeping angel is a being from another world. It’s defense mechanism causes it to turn to stone when it is seen by any other living creature. “So don’t blink. Don’t even blink. Blink and you’re dead.” (10th Doctor quote: BBC’s Doctor Who) If these creatures catch you not looking, they zap you into another time and feed on your time energy.  (Please forgive me my fellow Whovians if I have misspoken something and doubly forgive me for what I am about to do…transmit the image of an angel.) Oh dear, and now the normal people ask why I have asked for forgiveness for this transmission. Well, here it is. The danger of photographing a weeping angel is that any image transmitted of a weeping angel itself becomes a weeping angel (see BBC’s Doctor Who season 5, episodes 4 and 5: The Time of Angels and Flesh and Stone).

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All fandom references aside, I am ever amazed at the intricate detail and craftsmanship involved in these beautiful grave-markers. Some of the most fascinating sculptures I have seen have been in cemeteries much like this one. The statues are so detailed they almost seem to be living beings turned to stone. Their creators were true artists of the time. Throughout the cemetery are many stone figures and intricate scroll-work carved into marble and stone commemorating the life of the one laid to rest there.

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One can’t help but wonder as one walks along and views such masterpieces what the story is of the life laid to rest there. Many stories lie buried beneath the grave-markers, and the stories they hold are as varied as the markers above. Some intricate, lavish, and seen by all, and others simple and less-known. Every life lived and every story left behind it is a fading footprint that has left an impression on the lives and hearts touched by it. Though the stories may fade and be forgotten like the fading names on the markers above, the legacy left behind lives on in some way through those that carry on. It may seem a bit odd to be fascinated by these moss-covered cities of the dead, but thinking of these lives, these stories, and the people who carved their memory-marker makes for a great adventure stroll. So barring no run-ins with vagabonds or restless spirits, a stroll through the cemetery can make for a lovely outing…between rain showers.

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Pop quiz! Do you remember that first photo I showed you? What was in the center of it? Right! The Clock Tower! After leaving the cemetery, I traveled across town in search of Clock Tower Hill. There are seven of these hills in Rome, GA. I only visited two while I was there Sunday. I lived on one of the others many years ago while at school. The other four will have to wait for another day I suppose.  Anyway, so off I went. And you’ll never guess what I saw atop that hill! Well, yes, the Clock Tower of course, but what else? I stood upon this particular hill in the city of the living and peered across the valley at none other than that city of the dead that I had just left.

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Of course my first thought was, what a pretty view. My second thought after looking through my camera lens was, oh cool, I was just over there! So, I garnered a few shots of that lovely view, and if you can’t tell, I was rather fascinated by that church steeple. I actually got a couple more shots of it. Do you want to see? Of course you do.

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Then I turned around a got a few shots of the Clock Tower.

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And of course, I can’t go anywhere without getting a few shots of the flora, fauna, and wildlife.

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So even though there was rain, I wasn’t deterred from my Rome adventure, and I hope you enjoyed the walk through the cemetery with me. Oh, but before I go, there is one more story I would like to tell. As I headed off of the hill of the city of the dead, I was presented with an interesting sight. There before me was a lovely apartment complex. Beneath the name, it said Senior Residence. I just wasn’t sure what to think of that. Now, the cemetery is lovely, but I can’t for the life of me figure out why anyone, especially anyone nearing the end of life, would choose to have this as their balcony view. I certainly understand living near a cemetery.  I grew up with an old family cemetery on our property on the hill above our house. I spent my summers cleaning it with my mother and playing in it with my sisters and cousins. I heard stories of the people’s lives, and a few stories of those who weren’t quite settled in death (leading to avoidance of that area of the property after nightfall). I still reside near that old cemetery plot, and my ashes will one day be laid to rest there, too, but I can’t imagine choosing an apartment near a giant cemetery. All I could think is, “There’s nothing like stepping out onto your balcony and taking in the lovely view of your impending doom.” Okay, so maybe that’s a bit dramatic. My husband, of course, gave it the politically correct term of “progressive living arrangements”. Enough of the morbid thoughts now. I shall leave you with these lovely pictures, my thoughts, and a heartfelt “adieu”.

Cruisin’ the Southeast: A Fall Break Adventure

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From home, to mountains, to coast, to home…that’s how our Fall Break goes. One of the great things about living in a coastal state in the southeast is that you are within driving distance of the beach and the mountains. And on a really ambitious adventure, you can do them both in the same trip. That’s what my daughter and I did this Fall Break.

We started our journey by heading up to Mount Airy, North Carolina for a wedding photo shoot. Now for those of you who don’t know (as I didn’t before this trip), Mount Airy was the birthplace of the beloved tv personality, Andy Griffith, and the basis for Mayberry, the town in that wonderful classic, The Andy Griffith Show. So, now my daughter and I can say that we spent a couple of nights in Mayberry. We didn’t get any pictures in the town itself or get a chance to really explore, so we have plans to return there one day. However, it was a very cute and quiet little town nestled in the mountains.

The purpose of our visit, however, was a wedding photo shoot. That took us out to the beautiful Rosa Lee Manor near Pilot Mountain. Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains, it is a perfect place for a fall wedding. The property was beautiful, almost as beautiful as the couple getting married that day.

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We were doing the photo shoot for a friend of mine. Her daughter was “getting married” that day. I use quotes because they actually got married a year ago, but the big ceremony took place on this particular weekend a year later to celebrate their union with family and friends. The ceremony was lovely, and the family and all the beautiful young people were ready for a day filled with love and fun.

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The ceremony took place out at the gazebo with a beautiful view of the mountains behind. Complete with the yellowing leaves of fall, it was a scene that couldn’t be matched…quite the fairy tale wedding.

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And after the ceremony, the fun and festivities lasted well into the night. Feasting, dancing, and beautiful speeches by all filled the evening air.

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It was certainly a day to be remembered by all. I know that my daughter and I came away with beautiful memories…and a few great photos too (at least I hope the family thinks so).

But this was not the end for the mother/daughter team this Fall Break week. After the mountain wedding adventure, we took off for the beautiful coastal city of Charleston, South Carolina.

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Ahhh….Charleston. I must say, that of all the places in the southeast I have seen, this is by far one of my favorites. The culture is rich, the stories are hauntingly beautiful, and the city is magnificent. Just driving into the city makes me anxious to get my car parked away out of site and hit the streets walking and taking in the sights and sounds of this great city.

Getting the car parked, however, proved to be a challenge. The drop off at our condo was quite busy that Sunday afternoon. After circling the block about three times, we finally found a somewhat open spot to put the car for a moment to check in and get the keys to the valet. The last vestiges of this stressful experience soon melted away, however, as we carted our luggage through the courtyard to our beautiful unit.

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The fountain in the courtyard wasn’t operating on this particular week in October, but the lack of functionality allowed me to get a shot that I otherwise would not have gotten of the colors in the the center of the fountain bowl.

The courtyard scene that greeted us on arrival was one of iron tables, lounging guests sipping wine and laughing, and bicycles ready to be ridden down the streets of the city. After settling in to our unit, we freshened up and started walking in search of dinner. Of course debate soon ensued about the dining affair of the evening as I was not in the mood to have pizza for every meal, so I navigated us to the nearest Irish Pub and won the dinner debate…that time anyways. Tommy Condon’s was our dinner and entertainment provider that evening. We had a lovely meal and listened to a wonderful lady sing her Celtic tunes.

After dinner, we found some fudge to munch on and settled in for the evening to rest up for the next day’s adventure. I’m not sure when we headed out the next day, for sleeping in was the ultimate plan of the morning, but when we did, we hit the market first. The market was a wonderful place full of vendors of all sorts of things from mass market items to handmade crafts. The place was bustling and full of visitors. If ever you make it there, be sure to head by the wonderful smelling booth of The Old Whaling Company. I found some lavender and magnolia scrubs that smell divine and make my skin soft and fragrant. My daughter, of course, wanted just about everything she saw at the market.

After perusing the market, we headed to lunch…pizza of course (I didn’t win this time). The New York pizza place was just across the street from our condo, and the food was delicious. As we sat at the outside tables and waited on our lunch, we took a few photos along the street.

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After lunch, we wandered the streets and looked at the architecture and explored a graveyard or two.

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This graveyard was quite interesting. It was on a very small plot of ground, and all of the graves were very close together. (On the ghost tour that night, my daughter and I learned the difference between a graveyard and a cemetery, by the way. Little tidbit, a graveyard is a plot for graves attached to a church. A cemetery is usually larger and is not attached to a church.)

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One thing I found fascinating about this graveyard was that there were headstones everywhere. They were used as tiling in the walkways, and there were many attached to the base of the church. Several were attached to the wall surrounding the churchyard as well. I began to wonder if each marked an actual grave where a body was buried or if they were merely memorials of the long-ago deceased.

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There were some rather interesting scenes that I captured as well. This one interested me because of the three headstones framed by a low hanging tree branch.

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Later in the evening, we headed out for some night photography to fill our time before our scheduled ghost tour.

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We ended our evening with a ghost tour. The lovely husband-wife team, Maggy and Steve, at The Ghost Shop filled our evening full of haunting tales and unique history. We explored parks and alleys and discovered many more places to visit…on the next trip.

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Central State Hospital (Milledgeville, GA): Part 2

Back for more? Good! Hope you enjoyed that feature image. Did it feel like someone was staring out at you from the door? Well, let’s look closer.

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Hmmm…interesting capture. Is it a play of light, or is there really a giant eye staring out at us from the door? You decide. This wonderfully creepy old building is the Jones building. We drove over to this area around the pecan grove after leaving the Howell Building. This wasn’t the first building we saw, but it was certainly the most imposing. It seems to draw you toward it from across the grove.

Now, I haven’t discovered much about the history of each individual building on the campus, but in general, I have found some interesting history about the hospital. In 1904, there were 121 deaths due to tuberculosis, which ended in a cry from the staff for a facility to be built especially to treat this disease. And that same year, there was contamination in the water supply from Camp Creek resulting in an outbreak of typhoid fever. Also, throughout the years there were several deaths under suspicious circumstances and questionable practices such as electroshock therapy and lobotomies. Then, of course, with overcrowding and under-staffing, many a patient led a miserable existence behind these doors. So is someone hanging around, watching from the door, waiting for someone to return to take them home, waiting to warn others of danger, waiting to exact revenge, waiting to be seen and heard and known? Anything is possible with a history such as this.

But, like I said, this was not where we started, so let’s move back across the pecan grove to the Walker Building.

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The Walker Building is magnificent. It looks like a vine-covered castle. I could only get so close though as there were signs everywhere warning of unstable building and grounds. Alas, I was confined to the sidewalks, and even then only up to a certain distance.

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I did manage some photos of the vines creeping up the walls, some weathered windows, and some broken windows where you can see how the roof of the building has caved in and left the upper floor exposed to the elements.

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The front porch has also become weathered and worn over the years, and I’m sure serves as a wonderful backdrop for a spooky story or two.

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As you can see from this cornerstone, this building was erected in 1884. It served as the facility for white male convalescent patients. It was abandoned in 1974. It had a sister building across the grove that served as the facility for female patients. That facility has since been torn down and replaced with an auditorium. Only the front entrance portion of the building remains due to a cornerstone listing the names of some of the original founders of the institution. (There will be photos of this later.)

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A few photos through the windows give an idea of the rooms inside of this stately structure, as well as a glimpse of the damage of the elements over the years.

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The entrance to this facility, even though worn and overgrown, still maintains a welcoming appearance. This must have been one of the nicer facilities to be admitted to.

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Some of the other entrances, however, are maybe a little less inviting. We’ll leave those to the ghosts.

The building next door to the Walker building is the Green building. It is a large structure with enclosed porches along each side of the building.

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I included a color photograph here to give an idea of how the porches were constructed.

A curious thing I noticed when examining this building was that the glass in the windows at the apex of this building were shattered and gone. I’m not sure if this was due to storm damage or some other phenomena, but it gave the building a rather ominous appearance.

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There was one that remained, however, giving us a taste of the stately beauty of a bygone era.

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Today, however, the vines creep up the walls and within those walls the plaster peals.

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Next to the Green building is the chapel. The chapel is beautiful and appears to still be in use today. Service times are listed on the sign outside of the front of the building.

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After exploring the Walker building, the Green building, and the Chapel, we headed across the grove to the Jones building. Just as we were reaching the road, a security guard was driving by and stopped to chat. He had a lot of interesting stories to tell and offered suggestions of places to photograph. He also told us that this building was used by the crew of “The Originals”. Of course, living in the town where they film “The Vampire Diaries” (the show “The Originals” is a spin-off from), I had to hear about this. Apparently, the crew got permission to use the front entrance of the building for filming. The main entry and just beyond, where the building was more stable, was renovated for filming. The signs outside still remain forbidding entry beyond the sidewalk, however. The building and grounds still aren’t safe enough for the general public to walk around.

After chatting with the security guard for quite a bit, I got a few photos of this magnificent building…

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After visiting this building for a minute, we headed over to what was left of the female facility where there was the promise of a really interesting cornerstone.

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And this was the cornerstone bearing the name of the Georgia Lunatic Asylum. There was an event going on in the auditorium behind this building, so there was a good bit of foot traffic around the building. One man even asked if I thought the place was haunted…proof there are stories! This building, the name of which I cannot remember, had a lovely porch with impressive molding (no, not the fungus type…though I’m sure there was a fair share of that too).

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There was also an interesting spot to the rear of the building where a single brick was dislodged. I wonder why…

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And then around the corner…an eerie vine-covered staircase that led to a door in the basement. I venture a guess that the children that hang out at the auditorium have their imaginations go a little crazy with that one…

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The next building we came to, and we started moving fairly quickly due to losing daylight, was the museum. I only took one picture of this fairly new building.

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Now the next building to greet you around the corner I found to have a rather haunting presence about it. I do believe it rivaled the Jones building in the creep factor. This building is known as the Brantley building.

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I’m not quite sure why, but this particular building was not left open to the elements like many of the others. It’s windows were carefully boarded up. Are they trying to keep people out, or something else in? Hmmm…

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And the spider-like vine cover was hauntingly amazing!

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Fantastic!

And the last building we happened upon was the Powell building. This is a large white building that is still in use, and from what I understand was the first building on the campus.

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After this we headed out to one of the cemeteries. The acreage of the grounds was rather impressive; however, what struck me most was how scattered the few actual headstones were. I suppose the metal stakes we came upon at the head of the cemetery were once marking various graves throughout those grounds. Many of the remaining headstones had fallen into rubble and decay, but they were interesting nonetheless and at least marked the existence of the few who can still be identified.

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And on this All Hallow’s Eve…I leave you with a lovely photo of the moon…

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Oh, and you might want to check out some of these sites for some more history, information, and photographs…

Central State Hospital (CSH), Milledgeville, Georgia

http://themoonlitroad.com/milledgeville/

(use the custom google search bar on the left of their page to google central state hospital for even more stories)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_State_Hospital_(Milledgeville,_Georgia)

Also the Atlanta Journal and Constitution has some very good archived articles on this institution, one of which has quite a bit of interesting information:  Judd, Alan. “Asylum’s Dark Past.” Atlanta Journal and Constitution. Sunday, January 20, 2013. A1.

Payne, David H. “Central State Hospital.” New Georgia Encyclopedia. 03 September 2014. Web. 27 October 2014. (http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/science-medicine/central-state-hospital)

http://kingstonlounge.blogspot.com/2009/09/central-state-hospital-milledgeville-ga.html

Click to access cshmap.pdf

Central State Hospital (Milledgeville, GA): Part 1

Milledgeville, GA, once the capital city of our fair state, had by the time I came into being become known as the place where the “loony bin” resided. Now, I know that’s not politically correct, but it’s what people in these parts called it. The last thing you wanted was to be sent to Milledgeville. As a little girl, I was always curious about the place and frightened of it at the same time. I often imagined a town full of crazy people. As I grew older, I became aware of the fact that it was also the home of a good college, then Middle Georgia College (I believe it is now Georgia State College in Milledgeville or something like that). Over the years, I have driven by the city once or twice, but until the first part of this month, I had never really taken the time to explore. Now that I have, I will definitely be going back.

So what prompted my recent exploration? Well, my father-in-law has been doing some work out there, and after looking through some of my photography, he realized that I might really enjoy checking out the campus of Central State Hospital. And he was right!

One particularly beautiful Sunday afternoon, I went outside and told my husband, who was cutting grass, that my camera and I would like to go for a drive. He decided that he would go with me, so he put away the mower and off we went. But where would we go? Well, remembering the stories his dad told us about the hospital out in Milledgeville and knowing there were some great old buildings to photograph, we headed to Milledgeville.

Now, we headed there before I did the actual research on the place, so I didn’t realize that the campus consisted of over 1700 acres of land. That being said, the GPS found it a bit of a challenge to locate this place called Central State Hospital. Of course, one would assume that it would take us to the currently operational portion of the hospital or perhaps the museum, but good old Google Maps must know where I like to hunt, because where it took us was the Howell Building. (It must be familiar with my ghost hunting search history.)

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Now imagine this being the scene that greets you when you drive up to a spooky old abandoned hospital…behind a prison no less! My first thought was, “Patients go in, but they never come out.” Little did I know how true that thought was. Many a patient entered the walls of this institution only to spend the rest of their days there. Then, abandoned or forgotten behind the walls of this institution, left by family who didn’t know how to care for them or simply desired to be rid of them, many died with only a patient number, a file, and simple metal post to mark their existence.

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Approximately 25,000 souls lie beneath the grounds of this institution in the six cemeteries that dot the landscape. Between overpopulation and underfunding, it didn’t take long for this institution, originally named the Georgia State Lunatic, Idiot, and Epileptic Asylum, to begin losing patients due to disease, lack of care, and unfortunately mistreatment.

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So if you happen to be wandering around these grounds and feel like you’re not alone, it wouldn’t be surprising. Now, I can’t say that I saw any apparitions on this trip, but it certainly was a good place for haunts to hang out. That being said back to…

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While this was certainly not the oldest building on the site, it was quite interesting. It was also one of the few buildings you could walk all the way up to and really get a good look at and take some really great photographs. I decided shortly after arriving that black and white would be the way to go for this old place to add to the somewhat creepy ambiance…especially with Halloween coming up. Drawing from my memory bank of creepy horror stories about asylums and hospitals, you can only imagine the stories I was coming up with walking around this place. Especially when greeted with creepy scenes like this…

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Now, before you start thinking I broke into this old building, let me assure you, these photos were taken from safely outside through this bygone relic of vandals past…

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Unfortunately, broken windows were quite common with many of the buildings here. Also, due to the buildings being left to the elements and decay, completely missing windows and collapsed roofs were quite common as well, making many of the buildings unsafe to be entered. I hear there are portions that you can tour with permission, however, so I shall be making inquiries into that very soon.

The Howell Building was one of the newest of the abandoned structures and only fell into disuse in the early 1970s, yet it had its fair share of vine growth, broken windows, and general decay.

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As you can see, the cornerstone of the building puts the date at 1939, and apparently it was commissioned in 1940, so it was only in use for 30 to 35 years before being abandoned to the elements. And the elements have certainly taken their toll…

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Now, I want you to click on that last picture, because it is interesting. There’s a little white looking object in the second window from the top that I first thought was perhaps a smoke detector. On closer examination (zoom in), I realized it was a leather sofa. What is strange is that the brickwork from outside is reflected even to the contours of the sofa. It is propped up on its end with the back toward the reflection of the window from outside. I hope you can see it because it is fantastic. What I couldn’t figure out, however, is why the brickwork is reflected on the sofa the way that it is. If you have any insight, please feel free to post a comment.

Ok, now back to the rest of the photographs…

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And these last three of the Howell Building give a glimpse of some of the places where the roof has started collapsing…

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This was the start to a great adventure…however, this post has gotten long, so I leave you with piqued interest and those three dreaded words…

…to be continued….buahaha!